Melt & Pour Soap Base Review

Last updated 04/11/2020 | |

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How do you know which melt-and-pour soap base to use? Which one should you pick for your soapmaking project? Here are reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Making soap using the melt-and-pour method is the easiest way to make homemade soap. It’s especially fun and easy with kids, because you aren’t using caustic lye--that part of the soapmaking process has already been done for you.

But how do you know which melt-and-pour soap base to use? A quick Amazon search will give you more than 100 different ones to choose from. Which one should you pick for your soapmaking project?

I’ve done all the hard work of comparing soap bases for you!

Here are reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, ratings of their bubble-making ability (very important to the 6-year-old), and the different qualities that make some soaps better than others.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Once you've decided which base is right for you, here are easy instructions on how to work with your soap base and customize it with herbs and oils.

Here’s how to choose the best melt-and-pour soap base for your soapmaking needs.

Glycerin Melt and Pour Soap Base

The name “glycerin soap” is a bit misleading, because glycerin is present in all soaps. This soap base has additional glycerin added and is processed in a special way so it is translucent.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Features: Glycerin is a humectant, which means it is moisturizing.

Best for: normal to dry skin

Bubble rating: 3 out of 5 for good bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Shea Butter Melt and Pour Soap Base

Shea butter is made from the nut of the karite tree, which is found in central Africa. It’s used in many natural hair and skin products, including this melt-and-pour soap base, because it helps moisturize and strengthen hair and skin.

Features: Shea butter is moisturizing and nourishing.

Best for: those with dry skin or [cough] mature skin, like me.

Bubble rating: 5 out of 5 for excellent bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Aloe Vera Melt and Pour Soap Base

This soap base is made in the same way as the glycerin soap base above, and it has aloe vera added. This makes the soap soothing, with a silky texture.

Features: Aloe vera soap is both soothing and healing.

Best for: those with acne.

Bubble rating: 3 out of 5 for good bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Cocoa Butter Melt and Pour Soap Base

Cocoa butter is the fat from the seeds of the cacao bean--yes, the same plant that gives us chocolate. Cocoa butter melt-and-pour soap base does smell faintly of chocolate, which makes it a great way to start your morning.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Features: besides smelling divine, cocoa butter is rich and moisturizing for the skin.

Best for: Cocoa butter is recommended to help reduce stretch marks. This would be a great soap to make for an expecting mama!

Bubble rating: 4 out of 5 for very good bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Goat Milk Melt and Pour Soap Base

My first question was, “Why goat milk? Why not cow milk?” It turns out that goat milk is naturally homogenized (the cream doesn’t float to the top, but is evenly distributed throughout the milk). This makes goat milk soap base both rich and moisturizing.

Features: goat milk is nourishing for the skin, and contains vitamins and minerals that help keep skin healthy.

Best for: everyone, but especially helpful for sensitive skin, eczema, roseacea, or problem skin.

Bubble rating: 5 out of 5 for excellent bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

Olive Oil Melt and Pour Soap Base

Remember when doing a “hot oil treatment” on your hair was a big thing? Olive oil is used for hair and skin products, including melt-and-pour soaps, because it’s extremely mild and nourishing.

Features: extremely mild

Best for: the whole family (babies to grandparents).

Bubble rating: 4 out of 5 for very good bubbles.

Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.


Once you've mastered melt-and-pour soap, you're ready for the next step!

Making your own soap from scratch is easy with the detailed instructions in The Natural Soapmaking Ebook Collection by The Nerdy Farm Wife.

It contains everything you need to know about making your own natural soaps, milk soaps, and shampoo bars. There are lots of photos and step-by-step instructions. You'll love it! Click the photo to learn more.

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Read more about Homemade Soap

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Reviews of the 6 most popular melt and pour soap bases, what type of skin they are best for, and ratings of their bubble-making ability.

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Pam

Hi, I’m Pam! I created Brown Thumb Mama to share my natural living journey, and help you live a greener life. Thanks for being here, and please check out the resources in my Natural Living Shop!

35 Comments

  1. Moksha Essentials on December 31, 2020 at 12:45 am

    Excellent post and wonderful blog, this sort of interesting posts I really like, keep it up…

  2. Carina Johnson on November 7, 2020 at 8:33 pm

    Is white savon blanc soap melt ok to use on babies? I was making breast milk soap for my sons baby acne? But wasn’t sure which base to use I just bought that one because it was the only one in stock

  3. Antoinette on August 10, 2020 at 4:05 pm

    Thank you so very much for the info! I’m new to soap making. This list is soooooooo informative and well put together.

  4. Tash on June 4, 2020 at 12:58 am

    Hi, I make vegan soap and have been noticing that my essential oil is leaching from my SPC Crystal ST MELT AND POUR SOAP BASE after a week or so once I have packaged it up. What am I doing wrong is there any tips

  5. Vivian on April 29, 2020 at 4:51 pm

    vilataste@gmail.com
    Hi. I only have 2 types of glycerine soap base. White, and honey color or lighter.
    Can I add coconut butter, or She better or Olive oil to them?

  6. Flor on March 14, 2020 at 6:52 pm

    What about White Soap Savon Blanc, is that oil? And is it good for babies ?

  7. Tracy on October 12, 2019 at 2:57 pm

    From everything I’ve read you have to have lye in order to make soap, otherwise it’s called a beauty bar and I believe if what I’ve read beauty bars are not the best for cleansing.

    • Doris on February 29, 2020 at 7:13 am

      Thank you, most value information yet, I am a beginner and this is a great starting point for me.

  8. Wanita Kiser on October 9, 2019 at 11:30 pm

    What is soap made out of? Fat, Water & Lye.

    Soaps are sodium or potassium salts of long chain fatty acids. When triglycerides in fat/oil react with aqueous NaOH or KOH(Lye), they are converted into soap and glycerol. This is called alkaline hydrolysis of esters. Since this reaction leads to the formation of soap, it is called the Saponification process.
    It’s the chemical reaction that changes the lye from being caustic and the fat from being greasy. Science is awesome!

  9. Diana on August 22, 2019 at 1:42 pm

    I have very hard well H2O here in NM any ideas on what to add so I get the 5 of 5 bubbles? I use the goats milk melt and pour and the only place it bubbles is on my hair. I am trying to find different additives to help the bubbles. Any ideas?

  10. Raksha on August 21, 2019 at 12:34 am

    Do you have any website about how to make melt and pour soaps?
    Because I m trying my hands on melt and pour soaps but my skin feels really dry after using the soap I made ☹️ can you please help me out with a few tips & tricks?
    Thanks

  11. Annette on August 9, 2019 at 10:10 pm

    I loved this. Very informational, but I didn’t see any soap base for oily or combination skin. What soap bases do I use or additives to help with oily skin? Thank you.

  12. Jo on June 25, 2019 at 2:03 pm

    When I looked at the ingredients there was lye in the base!

    • Deb on January 11, 2020 at 2:08 pm

      All soap is made with lye melt and pour bases have already gone through the curing process! The lye is no longer in finished product. Cold Process soap is made with lye but as it cures the lye is no longer there. No lye no soap!

  13. Kathie on June 10, 2019 at 1:50 pm

    Could anyone answer please. Do you prefer Stephenson over Wholesales supplies plus? Thank you

    • Pam on June 10, 2019 at 8:01 pm

      Hi Kathie,
      I am always trying new soap bases. Stephenson is my favorite, and I’ve been really liking Saponify, which is a new company. They have a variety pack of soap bases: https://amzn.to/2WGMNTa

  14. kathyskreationshop on May 16, 2019 at 5:54 am

    Valerie, I prefer to use Stephenson’s base, I like to mix things into my bars and the suspension property is a little better than with some others so it is dispersed throughout the bar.

  15. Valerie on April 11, 2019 at 11:56 am

    What goat milk soap do you recommend? The link just goes to amazon, no specific product.

  16. Maureen DeVinko on April 1, 2019 at 11:11 am

    I have been researching essential oils benefits and making soaps for friends for a few months now. Everyone tells me I should start selling them so registered for my DBA…However have been reading up and if you claim that soap helps with different skin ailments it could be considered a cosmetic or medication. Has anyone had an issue with this and should I go to get FDA certified. Started out as a hobby but it’s really taking off and don’t want to have any problems. I label all ingredients on label and specify for external use only. Anyone have info to help with this.

    • Amber on February 11, 2020 at 6:52 am

      There can be a warning… search this on googleAs they have examples and be careful of your wording…. but it basically states, this product is not intended to cure or treat any diseases or illness. There are variations but it’s a great CYA…

    • Cynthia on April 23, 2020 at 10:43 am

      I would be careful in making any claims that your soap cures or aids in the cure of any skin problem.
      Stick to the basics and dont over reach. Use your customers testimonies as to what their experiences
      have been with using your soaps. Everysoap is not for Everybody which is the motto I use in my
      business. What works for some may not work for all

  17. Sheilam90254 on February 19, 2019 at 4:13 pm

    You can combine bases, or use one and add the other milk/butters for moisturizing properties. I’ve had great success with both.

  18. Linda Adamson on February 12, 2019 at 6:59 am

    I’ve used 2 or 3 different kinds of soaps in a layered design

  19. Rosemarie on January 10, 2019 at 12:42 am

    Hi Lisa I live in South Africa, and use African Black soap constantly, suffer with dermititis and really is a fantastic soap, a lot of friends i make for just love it, seems to clear up excema, spots and other skin problems, the best soap ever and totally organic.

  20. Zee on December 18, 2018 at 9:55 pm

    Thanks for the info. New to soap making

  21. Pam on November 24, 2018 at 2:21 pm

    Sure! The texture might be a little soft, but it should work fine.

  22. Jackson on November 20, 2018 at 3:39 pm

    Ww my daddy last name is Creasman
    William Bill Creasman! aka Bill!

  23. Tammy Creasman on November 14, 2018 at 6:31 pm

    Thank you so very much for the information…it’s the very best detailed info that I’ve found yet…job well done…

  24. Tavia on October 1, 2018 at 6:41 am

    Can the bases be mixed? Like, I love goat’s milk anything. But I also like cocoa & shea, would it work if I mixed all 3?

    • EuMeka on October 13, 2020 at 8:35 pm

      I’ve added raw shea butter to my goats milk base & it came out really good

    • Suny on October 25, 2020 at 5:53 pm

      You can mix bases. It is best to use bases from the same supplier when mixing. Mainly because each formula has a differnt melt point. It will still work mixing different brands, it’s just a little trickier to get it to set up correctly.

  25. Fe on September 23, 2018 at 11:53 am

    Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge about soap-making using natural ingredients. Love it!

  26. Lisa S on August 23, 2018 at 7:19 am

    Could you test two more soaps? I’m looking for information on the African Black and Triple Butter melt and pour soaps also. FYI: Totally fantastic job on the soaps rating. GREAT IDEA!

  27. Cheryl D Maggi on August 13, 2018 at 7:18 pm

    Thank you for this! I needed all the info you supplied!

    • Pam on August 14, 2018 at 7:13 pm

      Wonderful! Glad it helped you. 🙂

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Pam

Hi, I'm Pam!

I created Brown Thumb Mama to share my natural living journey and help you live a greener life. Thanks for being here! Learn more about me.

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